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Small Groups

We're the most connected society in history, yet we're the loneliest. Make connections that matter - join a small group.

Small Groups are groups of Mungarians that meet weekly in homes for Bible study, prayer, and to discuss the question, “How is your life with God?”
 
Why are Small Groups important?
What our world needs is not more Christians, but more people who are living like Jesus. It’s possible to claim to be a Christian and even to know a lot about the Bible and still be just as racist, greedy, cowardly, and selfish as you were when you first stepped foot in a church. We think that's crazy. We want to be a church filled with people who are becoming more like Jesus every day.

The best way to learn Spanish, lose weight, quit drinking, or run a marathon is to do so in the company of a small group of other like-minded folks. The best way to become more like Jesus is no exception: it happens most powerfully in a small group.
 
The Power of a Simple Question.
Small Groups are structured around a simple question: “How is your life with God?”  The very act of asking that simple question on a weekly basis causes you to pay more attention to your spiritual formation. Asking that one question at any particular group meeting might not seem significant, but asking that question in the presence of like-minded friends on an ongoing, weekly basis, is a practice that the Holy Spirit can use to drastically change your life. In the same way, doing a few pushups on any particular day won’t do much at all, but doing a few push-ups every day for years will make a great deal of difference. (If you'd like to know more about how our small groups are structured, check out Kevin Watson's book, The Class Meeting: Reclaiming the Forgotten (and Essential) Small Group Experience.)

What is the format of a Small Group?
Our groups meet for an hour and a half, once a week. During the 1st half of the meeting, we do some sort of Bible study together. For the 2nd half, we reply to the question, "How is your life with God?" We then close in prayer.

How do I get in a Small Group?
The easiest and best way to get into a Small Group is to join a new group at a Small Group Launch. Several times a year, we offer a Small Group Launch event. At a Small Group Launch, we’ll have some food, tell you a bit about our groups, provide you an opportunity to ask questions, and give you a chance to meet group leaders and sign up for a particular day and time.

Learn more information about our next Small Group Launch.

Learn more about becoming a Small Group leader.

For more information, Contact Mary Wilson.

Q. I’d like to join a group with only other [young married couples/empty-nesters/single women/banzai enthusiasts/etc.] type people. Is this possible?

A. What you’re looking for is what we call an “affinity group.” An affinity group is a group in which the people in the group all have something in common; e.g., a group of young married folks without kids would be an affinity group. In our experience, affinity groups usually make the strongest and best small groups, since it is obviously much easier to connect with people when we already have something in common with them.

If you can go ahead and form an affinity group on your own, go for it! If you have a natural network of folks in your neighborhood or social group (even if they don’t go to Munger), take a risk and invite them to form a group with you. Even if you form a group on your own, completely outside of church, we’d be happy to resource your group with Bible study materials and provide training for the group leaders.

If you are able to gather a small core of like-minded folks but not able to gather enough for a standard size group (8-12 people is a good number for a group), you’d be welcome to come to the Small Group Launch and recruit the necessary number of folks to fill out your group.

All of the above is meant to convey that we believe affinity groups make strong small groups. We’re in favor of affinity groups!

But….

At Small Group Launch, we deliberately do NOT form affinity groups.  Rather, we form groups around people’s availability for specific days and times in the week. (“In this corner is where folks who can meet on Wednesdays at 7 PM should all go to form groups.”) If affinity groups naturally form during the Group Launch, great, but we don’t seek to form groups around specific affinities. The reason we don’t try to form affinity groups at the Group Launch is because we have a relatively diverse church, and we’ve found that affinity groups have a way of excluding folks in our community who might not fit in this or that demographic group. We have no problem if a Tuesday night small group is mainly made up of young parents, but at Small Group Launch we don’t want to exclude anyone who might want to join that group, whether or not he or she is a young parent.

One of the things we all love about Munger is that there are people in our church who are very different from us—people that we would never meet and befriend apart from church. In fact, one of the ways the Lord might most want to grow and stretch you is through a friendship with someone who seems totally different from you at first.